Canadian Building organizations call for Zero Emissions by 2030, along with World Green Building Council. Vancouver and Victoria take action

In August, eleven organizations in Canada’s building industry released a public letter to the Ministers of Natural Resources and of Environment and Climate Change, calling on the federal government to develop “strong action and new policy for the buildings sector”. Their letter  calls for  a national plan with goals for 2030:  retrofitting so that 30 per cent of existing building stock achieves energy reductions of 25 to 50 per cent, and “nearly zero” for all new construction.  The letter also calls for a suite of policies relating to benchmarking, standards, building codes, and “support for education and training of professionals and trades involved in retrofit and new construction projects”.  Signatories to the letter are: Canadian Energy Efficiency Alliance;Pembina Institute; Toronto Atmospheric Fund; Architecture Canada;  Association Québeécoise pour la Maîtrise de l’Énergie; BOMA Toronto;  Council for Clean Capitalism;  Environmental Defense; Équiterre;  MaRS Advanced Energy Centre; and Passive House Canada.

Canada was one of 8 countries named in a press release by the World Green Building Council on June 28, announcing the Advancing Net Zero Project.  Architecture 2030, a non-profit, is also a partner. The goal of the initiative is to meet the COP21 pledge to  reduce CO2 emissions from the buildings sector by 84 gigatonnes by 2050, through net zero buildings and deep renovation , including all new buildings and major renovations should be net zero starting in 2030 , all buildings should be net zero by 2050, and 75,000 professionals trained on net zero building by 2030, with 300,000 by 2050 .

In July,  the City of Vancouver released a  Zero Emissions Building Plan,   which states:  “this is an action plan to achieve zero emissions in all new residential and office building by 2025; high-rise multi-unit residential buildings will be required to achieve zero emissions by 2030.” (The Plan states that 82% of new development in Vancouver is residential, 1-2% is office space, and the remaining 16% miscellaneous building types). The Plan was developed in “close collaboration” and consultation with  other local governments, professional associations, academic institutions, non-governmental agencies, energy utilities and the development industry – but no unions were included in the process. “The Plan was also shaped and informed by ongoing discussions with the cities of New York and Brussels.”

One of the new tools announced is a Centre of Zero Emission Building Excellence which will be a physical space, and “will partner with professional and industry associations to host training events, courses, panels, and exhibits. In addition, the Centre could administer mission-related programs on behalf of partner organizations, such as energy-efficiency incentive programs.”  It is modelled on the examples of New York’s Building Energy Exchange (BEEx), and Wood Works B.C.  , hosted by the Canadian Wood Council .

Vancouver’s Renewable City Strategy  , adopted in November 2015,  targetted 100% of the city’s energy to come  from renewable sources before 2050. Victoria, the capital city of British Columbia, is catching up to Vancouver with an August announcement of  a 100% renewable energy target , and a goal to reduce carbon emissions 80% by 2050.  Victoria has identified the priority areas of retrofitting buildings, developing new construction guidelines, encouraging renewable district energy systems, and facilitating a  shift towards active transportation. Next steps for Victoria: an action plan, task force,  and community and stakeholder consultation.

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