After the March for Jobs, Justice and the Climate: What next?

Panels not pipelines by Abdul Malik

From Edmonton, photo by Abdul Malik, posted on People’s Climate Movement Facebook page

The  March for Jobs, Justice and the Climate drew thousands to Washington D.C., and cities around the world, including communities across Canada. Coverage in Canada, so far, seems limited to brief overviews – see  the CBC and here  and the Energy Mix.    For the most complete   photos and posts from across Canada, as well as video from Washington, go to the  People’s Climate Movement Canada Facebook page – where the group is hosting a conference call on May 3 for a discussion of “what’s next?”.

A report in Vox  brings together photos and video of the Washington crowds, while noting  that, compared to the Science March on April 22, the Climate March was  “more explicitly anti-Trump, more intersectional, and more social justice oriented.”   Organizers are quoted as claiming  more than 150,000 people attended,  including 43 labor union buses, indigenous  people and communities of color, and a big faith and youth contingent.   Other U.S.  reports are at Think Progress  ;  Inside Climate News , and mainstream media, which generally focussed on crowd estimates  and photos of “the best signs”:   “Climate March draws thousands of Protesters Alarmed by Trump’s Environmental Agenda”   in the New York Times ,  and  the Washington Post report , which was republished in the Toronto Star  .

As for that obvious question of “what’s next?”,  read “It can’t just be a march it has to be a movement. What’s next for climate activists”  (April 30) in the Washington Post or The Climate March’s Big Tent Strategy Draws a Big Crowd: But will it make a difference?” in  The Atlantic (Apr. 30), which states:  “Whether the protest will eventually result in political success is an open question. Due to the hyperpolarized politics of climate change, it may ultimately depend on other factors—whether the Democratic Party can harmonize a political message, for instance. And the lack of any one unifying climate policy may prove troublesome when it comes time for the movement’s leaders to govern again.

But protests are not only about legislative success. …Rather it is for people to register their mass discontent and mobilize around a movement’s shared goals. For the moment, the People’s Climate Movement seems to have accomplished that. ”

Sudbury climate march

From Sudbury Ontario Climate March, posted at People’s Climate March Facebook page

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s